QUICK TOUR OF THE EXHIBITON

The Þorvaldseyri Visitor Centre is divided into two exhibit rooms. From your first step inside, you see clear, colorful graphics and dramatic photos that both explain the volcanic and geologic forces and summarize major volcanic and historical events. This room also has a small souvenir section with a wide variety of local items.

Farther inside, to the left of the entry, is a 60-seat theatre where we show our 20-minute film about the volcano eruption and how we coped with it. When the film is not showing, this room is a second exhibit hall, with huge, exciting photos of the eruption on display.
 

- PREVIEW THE TRAILER FOR OUR MOVIE -

Trailer: Short film

Get a feel for the power of the eruption and impact it had.

Be prepared—this is NOT a typical home-movie!

The short film itself runs 20minutes.

We at Þorvaldseyri have lived almost all our lives at the foot of Eyjafjallajökull, and after decades of silence, the volcano underneath this glacier woke up. Following an earlier, smaller eruption at Fimmvörðuháls, this forced yet another evacuation.
 
But eventually the eruption stopped and efforts to save the bridges and many hectares of crops were successful. After the damage was surveyed, a tremendous area clean-up effort began with the help of neighbours and volunteers. Summer came and as crops grew, we saw the seeds of hope growing literally before our eyes.
Although repairs and clean-up have been time-consuming, we are determined to keep our farm in harmony with Nature. So, we are working towards self-sufficiency, with our own hydro-electric generator, on-site hot and cold water sources. We also grow barley wheat and rapeseed (canola) and continue innovative plantings of other crops.

- A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS  -

No matter how dramatic written reports are, it is hard to top images when it comes to conveying the real power, vast devastation, and the intense struggle to survive the Eyjafjallajökull eruption.
Many of the world’s leading photographers and photojournalists (and some very lucky amateurs) took up positions close to the volcano and their efforts were rewarded with incredible images of this powerful event and of the people facing amazing challenges.